Tag Archives: water

Weekly Photo Challenge: H2O of Life

We are approaching the end of the dry season here and have the odd storm – but water still remains scarce away from the Lake. This summer we have had constructed a bird bath, comprising a wheel hub, pole and some metal prongs it resembles a hat stand but the bind lid sitting upon the prongs reveals it’s true purpose. It took several weeks to attract it’s first customers but is now in use by birds of all sizes including the Yellow-billed Black Kites which swoop in for a drink.


Other birds include house sparrows, yellow-vented bulbuls, african thrushes and red-billed fire finches, a grey-headed kingfisher- all seeking H2O

Weekly Photo Challenge: H2O (of Life)

We are approaching the end of the dry season here and have the odd storm – but water still remains scarce away from the Lake. This summer we have had constructed a bird bath, comprising a wheel hub, pole and some metal prongs it resembles a hat stand but the bin lid sitting upon the prongs reveals it’s true purpose. It took several weeks to attract it’s first customers but is now in use by birds of all sizes including the Yellow-billed Black Kites which swoop in for a drink.


Other birds include house sparrows, yellow-vented bulbuls, african thrushes and red-billed fire finches, a grey-headed kingfisher- all seeking H2O

WeeklyPhoto Challenge: (Water’s) Edge

A submission to this week’s photo challenge taken at the water’s 
edge at Whisby Nature Reserve in the UK this summer. The sharp plants standing out against the blurred water.

Weekly Photo Challenge : Pure Water

A submission to the Weekly Photo Challenge : PureIMG_5045

Water here is not something you drink out of the tap. It has to be boiled and filtered first. Out and about you have to buy water in bottles – as here on the road near Singida on our return to Mwanza last summer. The bus had broken down and stuck by the roadside in the heat – the water was very much in need.

 

Weekly Photo Challenge: Water in Motion

Here is a submission to this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge: Motion

Waterfalls are amazing sites of nature. In Uganda we were able to visit both Sipi Falls and Murchison Falls.

 Murchison Falls

The Nile river flows into the Rift Valley through a gap of a few  metres wide creating dramatic motion.

 SIPI FALLS

Sipi Falls is actually three separate water falls collecting water from Mount Elgon – the water will eventually flow into the Nile. We walked from the 2nd to the 3rd and back to the 1st. The last fall on our walk was the most dramatic.

UTI

Anita and Bex are back at the clinic for a follow up check, both have had UTI.
IMG_9499.JPGThere is a general consensus in the staff room that whenever you’re ill you get diagnosed with one or both of two things: Malaria and UTI (urinary tract infection). Moreover this is the doctor’s get out clause when he / she can’t admit they don’t know. Hence there is a widespread distrust of the doctors here.

I think that our early experience with the doctors probably bears this out. Nonetheless our second visit to a different and more respected clinic whilst debunking Malaria (along with Amoebic Infection) concurred with the UTI diagnosis.

A more sceptical colleague was dismissive of this too, but I’d like to suggest here why UTI might be more common than we would suppose. The rationale here is not mine but those of a UK trained Kenyan doctor whom Anita recently met. It make sense to me from my (albeit non-Biological) Science background and can be summarised as follows:

  1. It’s hot here – so we sweat a lot.
  2. We don’t drink enough water.
  3. We don’t go for a wee (pee) often enough.

The result is the urine is more concentrated and sits in the bladder for longer. This gives any bugs longer to get established before being passed. Hence we are more prone to infection aka UTI.

We can’t deal with the first point – it’s not going to get much colder – ever! So perspiration is not going to stop!

We have to tackle the second by drinking more, which will affect the third.

The problem is that water here cannot be drunk from the tap (not without risking further diseases). It comes either in a bottle (1.5L for 1000TzS) or else must be boiled, cooled and filtered prior to drinking. It’s a a bit of a palaver, but must be done.
Cheers!
IMG_9500.JPG

Power

This blog is posted by the power of 3G, (or possibly Edge) as we have no WIFI. After a day without water on Sunday, today has been a day without power in Mwanza. This has been a planned power cut, for reasons unknown, which has lasted from 9am until now ( it is supposed last until 6pm!). Luckily at Isamilo we have our own generator so I was able to teach today (ICT without electricity would be a chore!). Unfortunately the generators have not been used here at home – so it could be a dark night ahead if timings slip. We had a taster last night with an hour long power cut from 6:30pm ’till 7:30pm. Not fun has we were cooking dinner at the time (at least we have gas!).
With no power the water is back to a dribble. It turns out the water issue on Sunday was virtue of a power cut at the waterworks (no power = no pumps and we live in a mountainous region).
After two months in which utility-wise there were no issues – suddenly we realise we are in a developing country – either that or 1970’s Britain for those who remember!