Monthly Archives: June 2016

Weekly Photo Challenge: Floral Partners

A submission to this week’s photo challenge – from a different time and place (UK 2014) – before we came out here to Tanzania – our old English Garden had a floral partners which in May produced the most stunning display of blue and white.

A Bird a Day in June: Day 30 – Bronze Mannikin

Day 30 of a series illustrating some of the fantastic birds we see here on Lake Victoria and across Tanzania. Many of these are seen in our garden including this one.

A Bird a Day in June: Day 29 – Southern Red Bishop

Day 29 of a series illustrating some of the fantastic birds we see here on Lake Victoria and across Tanzania. Many of these are seen in our garden – but this one is not but from close by.

Southern Red Bishop

A Bird a Day in June: Day 28 – Black-backed Puffback

Day 28 of a series illustrating some of the fantastic birds we see here on Lake Victoria and across Tanzania. Many of these are seen in our garden including this one.

Black-backed Puffback

A Bird a Day in June: Day 27 -Northern Carmine Bee-eater

Day 27 of a series illustrating some of the fantastic birds we see here on Lake Victoria and across Tanzania. Many of these are seen in our garden – but this is the another one from elsewhere in Tanzania and further afield.

Northern Carmine Bee-eater

Other Bee-eaters

Rising Waters

One thing which has been apparent over the almost two years we have been in Mwanza, that is the fact that the Lake is rising!

Lake Victoria’s waters are flooding over the low lying land along the shoreline, like here at Charcoal Ribs, Jembe Beach south of Mwanza.

The above photo was taken a month after the end of the rainy season (we have had very little rain this past month) but the waters are not receding. This photo was taken south of Mwanza on Jembe Beach, but the pattern is repeated along the length of the lake where we have encountered it at Igombe, Papa’s, Talapia, Tunza and Malaika

Researchers in Uganda have measured water level rises of almost 6m in two years. Lake Victoria is a shallow lake and has only one outlet, the River Nile at Jinja. This accounts for 15% of the outflow. The water comes in via streams and the Kagera River, but again this does not account for much.

The water levels are mainly affected by rainfall and evaporation. Climate change appears to be having a big effect on Lake Victoria.

Information taken from

http://allafrica.com/stories/201601060324.html

http://www.standardmedia.co.ke/mobile/article/2000181998/lake-victoria-water-to-rise-in-next-10-years

Weekly Photo Challenge: (Feathered) Partners

A submission to this week’s photo challenge: Partners this one focus on the birds seen in our garden – part of my bird a day in June series