Monthly Archives: April 2015

Weekly Photo Challenge: Impala in Motion

Here is a submission to this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge: Motion.

Taken from our Safari in the Serengeti – these jumping Impala showed some impressive motion as they leapt across the countryside.

The next best thing!

Here in Tanzania there are many things we have to go without entirely – cinema for example (although rumour has it the new shopping mall will have one). Other things have needed to be substituted.

Anita and I used to enjoy a ‘coffee’ at Costa while in the UK, but the nearest Costa is thousands of miles away.
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There are some good coffee shops in Uganda – notably in Jinja and Mbale, but what about Mwanza. Here at home the next best option is the Coffee Shop in the Gold Crest Hotel. Here you can get a Mocha Shake and Iced Spiced Macchiato, Cappuccino etc.

   It’s not Costa but it’s the next best thing.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Slow Motion

Here is a submission to this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge: Motion

These two snails:

One British, one Tanzanian;

One large one small.

Both slow!

The UK snail featured in an earlier challenge from May 2014

Some Very British Rain

Most rain here is of the Tropical kind. A short sharp intense downpour which is followed by hot sunshine. That has been the pattern for any rain we’ve had in the past eight months.

Not today!

  
Today (and in fact ever since last evening) we have had continuous rainfall. Much of this has been gentle rain, reminiscent of April showers back home. This has been indispersed with the usual heavy downpour of which we are used.  

 Reports from parts of the UK, indicate that they have had little by way of rain for a few weeks – so it looks like we have their rain here. 

 

Night Life (Under a Net)

Each night before turning in we put it down. Each morning when we get up we put it up.

The mosquito net.   

 Living in Africa there is the ever present risk of contracting Malaria and so precautions are necessary. It’s a matter of routine. 

 We stopped taking anti-malarial drugs fairly early on – the risk to the body of long term use  is far greater than the risk of contracting the disease. With suitable precautions it should not be an issue. 

Malaria is a disease carried by the female of just one species of mosquito (Anopheles) and thee are many different species of mosquito. Furthermore you have to have been bitten by a mosquito which has recently bitten someone with Malaria. 

Here in town and working in a school this is highly unlikely that this will happen. With good health malaria is not nice, but it  is not a killer either. The use of repellant (DEET), a fan (mosquitoes like still air) and a net combine to reduce the risk at night.    

A mosquito net covers the bed. Our net is attached to a frame suspended from the ceiling. This is a bit of a pain as it is a little small for the bed – it is stretched a little bit works provided the bed is not moved. Our net is not walk-in nor does it surround the bed as some do. This means we need to put it up and down which can be a pain.     

  A better option we will consider soon is attaching a T-bone to either end of the bed (a T-shaped piece of wood at both ends) and suspending a net from this. If the arms of the “T” are long enough it should surround the bed more effectively.

For now our net keeps us safe each night. 

 

Weekly Photo Challenge: Water in Motion

Here is a submission to this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge: Motion

Waterfalls are amazing sites of nature. In Uganda we were able to visit both Sipi Falls and Murchison Falls.

 Murchison Falls

The Nile river flows into the Rift Valley through a gap of a few  metres wide creating dramatic motion.

 SIPI FALLS

Sipi Falls is actually three separate water falls collecting water from Mount Elgon – the water will eventually flow into the Nile. We walked from the 2nd to the 3rd and back to the 1st. The last fall on our walk was the most dramatic.

A Long Wait for a Long Root

It’s taken three months and three different avocado stones but finally finally we have roots on our Avocado. It’s been a long wait for a very long root. Whilst pineapples have come and gone (we have rooted and planted five in the same time period) the avocado has remained stubbornly inert. I was on the point of throwing out yet two more stones whence returned from Uganda, until  I noticed the root.    Here are the newly planted Pineapples.   …and their older cousins. I have also tried planting orange seeds – it’s early days but we’re getting something.